New Paper Published Using NIC Resources

A team from the Reck-Peterson Lab, in collaboration with Wade Harper’s lab at Harvard, recently published a paper in JCB showing that the dynein-dynactin activator protein Hook3 is capable of scaffolding KIF1C to dynein-dynactin http://jcb.rupress.org/content/early/2019/07/17/jcb.201812170.long. By forming a tripartite complex, KIF1C can use it’s plus-end directed motor activity to move the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin to the cell periphery, where it can then bind cargoes and move them in towards the cell center. The in vitro imaging data was produced on scopes in the Reck-Peterson lab, but they imaged their immunofluorescence samples on our A1R-HD confocal, and we were able to help them write an automated analysis script to rapidly quantitate co-localization between various forms of Hook3 and KIF1C.

Figure 6 from DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201812170 showing the imaging and quantitation of Hook3 and KIF1C.

Figure 6 from DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201812170 showing the imaging and quantitation of Hook3 and KIF1C.